This Issue of The Grapevine Magazine

Custom Crush Success

Having been on both sides of custom crush not only as a winemaker for an outside winery customer but also as a winemaking client in another’s winery I feel especially adapted to help people and winery businesses with this endeavor. Making sure your grapes and wine get the excellent treatment they deserve is always the top consideration. You want to make excellent wine, without winemaking flaws, as a bottom line. Choosing Your Custom Crush Partner Make sure to choose a custom crush winemaking facility that is adapted to your size and style. If you care for the products that winery makes that is a key asset that you can hopefully build on but it is not a given your wines […]

Read Full Article

Planning for a Successful Event

Wineries use a multitude of technology and resources to nurture vineyards to maturity and craft fine wines to bottle. Neither viticulture nor viniculture is left to chance, and neither should winery events. A world class event can excite customers into a lifetime love affair with your wine. That is the goal after all, is it not? A live event may seem old-fashioned in today’s online world, but special events and promotions provide an avenue to build your brand, connect with customers and launch new products. All the technology in the world cannot replace the personal experience with you and your winery. But orchestrating a successful event requires far more than just sending an invitation. The Grapevine Magazine interviewed managers at […]

Read Full Article

Ontario’s Cool Climate Winemakers Will Show the World How It’s Done

The 2016 International Cool Climate Wine Symposium, held in Brighton, England, May 26th to 28th, closed with an announcement rewarding the 2020 event to Canada, where it will be hosted by Brock University’s Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI) in Ontario. The CCOVI is recognized throughout the wine world as the preeminent wine research and education center of the Canadian wine industry. CCOVI was created in 1996 by a group of wine industry leaders in the tradition of similar institutions in other wine making regions. Representatives of the Grape Growers of Ontario, the Wine Council of Ontario, and the Winery and Grower Alliance of Ontario, approached Brock University to form a partnership. A very successful partnership, according to a […]

Read Full Article

Alfalfa Farm Winery:

A Great Good Place Small, family-owned Alfalfa Farm Winery, built a former dairy farm in Topsfield, Mass., is not just a winery. It’s also a social center for a group of volunteers who come together throughout the year to tend the vineyards, harvest the grapes, bottle the wines and, oh yes, socialize. Owner Richard Adelman, Professor of Sociology at Northshore Community College in nearby Danvers, Mass., likes to refer to his winery as “The Great Good Place,” named after the title of a book by an urban sociologist on the importance of informal gathering places. “It could be a restaurant, a ball game, a park bench — a place where people come together to actually communicate with each other,” said […]

Read Full Article

Starting a New Winery?

Top Ten Questions You Should Ask A sunset over acres of vines, while enjoying a glass of your own rosé. Early morning strolls through rows of grapes. Anyone planning to enter the wine industry has dreams and visions like these. However, parallel to these glorious dreams comes a lot of hard work—and, importantly, legal compliance. Starting any new business can be overwhelming, and taking the leap to start a winery is certainly no exception. The details can be overwhelming and a newcomer can often lose sight of the larger picture. This article aims to review ten of the legal or compliance steps all new winery businesses should consider when starting out. And for those already producing wine, the below may […]

Read Full Article

Wines of the New World: Brazil

Winemaking in Brazil is finally coming into its own, as evidenced by their showing at the 2015 International Wine Challenge (IWC), held annually for the last 33 years by William Reed Business Media. The IWC is accepted as the world’s finest and most meticulously judged wine competition, assessing every wine blind and judging each for its faithfulness to style, region and vintage. Brazil picked up two Gold, three Silver, and 11 Bronze medals. But this success has not come quickly or easily, and it almost didn’t happen at all. The first vines were brought to Brazil from Portugal in 1532. These Vitis vinifera seedlings were planted in the Captaincy of São Vicente in the Southeast, but did not survive the […]

Read Full Article

A PRE-HARVEST REVIEW

One of the unusual things about being a winemaker is that it is a highly seasonal occupation. The specific knowledge and skills used during the “crush”, or harvest period, often must be re-learned from year to year. By the end of the season you can recite easily the correct way to hydrate a yeast inoculum from memory, and convert liters to gallons and back again “on the fly”. But the first week of harvest often finds winemakers re-learning, or at least reviewing, often the most basic techniques, methods, and calculations used in winemaking. Don’t be guilty of “pride” in your memory. Review is easy and it works. With that in mind I have written about the many things I have […]

Read Full Article

ENGAGING WITH WRITERS BEFORE “THE ASK” (Part 2)

This is the second part of a two-part series. Part one appeared in the May/June issue of The Grapevine Magazine and is available online. I continue my conversation with Jim Gullo about what it’s like to be a professional writer, and to discuss the wine business from his perspective. Jim is a self described Author, Journalist, Wine Writer, Food Eater & Pastryologist. He tweets, he writes, he eats and he’s coming back for more. His work appears regularly in the Alaska Airlines Magazine, Horizon Airlines Magazine, Oregon Wine Press and other publications. Turning to books in recent years, Jim has most recently authored Grouch Bag, a children’s novel about finding the Marx Brothers; Trading Manny, the story of how he […]

Read Full Article

Preparing for a Successful Harvest

Harvest time comes only once a year, which is why it’s crucial that you’re prepared when the big day finally arrives. Determining When to Harvest Most vineyards in North America and Europe will harvest grapes in August, September, and October. Typically, sparkling wine grapes are harvested first to ensure lower sugar levels, followed by the white wine grapes. Red wine grapes take a bit longer to reach full maturation, so they’re harvested later in the season. Finally, the grapes for ice wines make their way to crush, as it’s desirable they dehydrate on the vine to create a raisin-like grape with highly concentrated sugars. In most cases, a vineyard manager will check the grapes every day during the week or […]

Read Full Article

A Wine Press Primer

Without the invention of the wine press, vintners would still be crushing grapes with their hands and feet as they did in the Middle Ages. And, although much has changed since the early years, the primary objective has remained the same: extract as much juice as possible while producing the best wine. Choosing the right equipment is a big part of the quality winemaking equation. In this article we will explore the various types of wine presses on the market today and get input from three vendors of varying scope and size, along with an overview of the machines they offer, including operation, maintenance, and after sale support. Wine presses fall into two basic categories: batch and continuous. Batch presses, […]

Read Full Article

The Vineyard Labor Crisis

Part I – Factors Contributing to the Worker Shortage Having enough help in the vineyard is the hottest topic for owners and managers in 2016, according to the results of the Vineyard Economics Survey conducted by the Wine Industry Symposium Group. Over half of survey respondents said labor was their top concern, followed by pests, water availability, and the political impact of the upcoming presidential election. There is good reason for concern. Overall in the U.S., a shortage of people to tend the fields is reducing fruit and vegetable production by 9.5%, or $3.1 billion, a year, according to a recently published analysis of government data by the Partnership for a New American Economy, a nonpartisan group that supports a […]

Read Full Article